Archive for February, 2011

Vermeer Museum Awakens…

February 23rd, 2011

The National Gallery of Scotland has done a succinct feature on its Vermeer, Christ in the House of Martha and Mary complete with a video. Nice to see  the museums are awakening to the immense possibilities that the web offers for art history-related  applications although they still have quite a bit of sleep in their eyes. Here’s where to go:

http://www.nationalgalleries.org/collection/in_focus/4:20388/20377/20377

Conference: The young Vermeer in context

February 23rd, 2011

The Young Vermeer in Context
5 March 2011, 2pm – 6:30pm
National Gallery of Scotland
The Mound
Edinburgh EH2 2EL
United Kingdom

information form the museum:

The young Vermeer presents a unique opportunity to compare directly the three earliest paintings by Johannes Vermeer. On occasion of this exhibition the National Gallery of Scotland is staging a study afternoon, bringing together a distinguished group of international experts. Focussing on Vermeer’s early career the talks will revisit his start as a history painter and shift to genre painting, his artistic and social environment, and the rediscovery of  “Young Vermeer” in the 19th century. The podium will offer the opportunity to get involved and discuss these important paintings with the experts and to discover more about the development of one of the world’s most celebrated artists.

speakers:

– Dr. Albert Blankert, Independent Scholar, The Hague
– Edwin Buijsen, Head of Collections, Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague
– Dr. Adriaan E. Waiboer, Curator of Northern European Art, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin

podium:
– Professor Christopher Brown, Director, The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford
– Professor Gregor J. M. Weber, Head of the Department of Fine Arts, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

moderation:

– Dr Tico Seifert Senior Curator of Northern
European Art, National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

1.30 – 2pm, registration (HLT)
2 – 5pm,  study afternoon (HLT)
5 – 6.30pm, Wine reception and private view (NG)

Tickets: £12 (£10 concessions) are available from
the Information Desk at the National Gallery Complex,
or by calling 0131 624 6560, Monday

see museum flyer:
http://www.codart.nl/images/02526_NGS_
TheYoungVermeerInContext%20A5%20Flyer%28Final%29v4.pdf

“Is Google Art Project second-rate?” (yes)

February 11th, 2011

I’m not losing much sleep  over Google’s Art Project virtual tours and neither is Sebastian Smee at the Boston GlobeIs Google Art Project second-rate?

Compare Synthescape‘s virtual tour of the Couldtard Gallery to any on Google’s overblown shows. Some people actually get things right.

Vermeer’s Lacemaker and other paintings by Vermeer go to Cambridge

February 8th, 2011

Vermeer’s Women: Secrets and Silence
October 5, 2011 – January 15, 2012
The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England

from the museum website:
At the heart of this visually stunning exhibition is Vermeer’s extraordinary painting The Lacemaker (c.1669-70) – one of the Musée du Louvre’s most famous works, rarely seen outside Paris and now on loan to the UK for the first time. The painting will be joined by a choice selection of other key works by Vermeer representing the pinnacle of his mature career, and over thirty other masterpieces of genre painting from the Dutch “Golden Age.” Featuring works from museums and private collections in the UK, Europe and the USA – many of which have never been on public display in Britain – this Cambridge showing will be the only chance to see these masterworks brought together in one location.

<http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/whatson/exhibitions/article.html?2793>

Google “Art”?

February 3rd, 2011

Google Art: Although the scans of the single paintings are admirable and perhaps even useful, the museum tours leave much, too much to desire. The Frick is especially low quality and captures literally nothing of atmosphere that makes this museum unique.  I suppose it’s all done efficiently as possible, but still, one could reasonably expect more from Google. Wheeling around a hi-tech camera cart up and down the halls does not guarantee results no matter how much the devise costs and even if your name is Google. Technology must be used sensibly or otherwise we just get just one more silly toy.  D- for effort, there are other realities outside Silicon Valley.

Vermeer Travels to Qatar

February 2nd, 2011

The Golden Age of Dutch Painting, Masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum
11 March – 6 June, 2011
Museum of Islamic Art, Doha

Qatar Museums Authority (QMA) in collaboration with the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, presents The Golden Age of Dutch Painting, Masterpieces from the Rijksmuseum, the first major exhibition of Dutch art in the Gulf region. It will take place in the temporary exhibition hall at the Museum of Islamic Art from 11 March – 6 June, 2011.

Forty-four paintings, among the best in the Rijksmuseum’s collection are being loaned to QMA. These paintings give a wide-ranging view of the artists, lifestyle and topography of Holland in the seventeenth century. Included are works of Rembrandt and Vermeer (The Love Letter ).

<http://www.qma.com.qa/eng/index.php/qma/news_item/169>

Something to Smile About

February 2nd, 2011

Google has recently added some extremely detailed (and nuanced) digital images of Vermeer’s works in their googleartproject Google Art Project collection. So far, I have discovered these… Enjoy please.

The Love Letter
http://www.googleartproject.com/museums/rijks/the-love-letter-44

The Little Street
http://www.googleartproject.com/museums/rijks/view-of-houses-in-delft-known-as-the-little-street-46

The Milkmaid
http://www.googleartproject.com/museums/rijks/the-milkmaid-48

Woman with a Pearl Necklace
http://www.googleartproject.com/museums/gemaldegalerie/young-woman-with-a-pearl-necklace-98

Officer and Laughing Girl
http://www.googleartproject.com/museums/frick/officer-and-laughing-girl-6

The Glass of Wine
http://www.googleartproject.com/museums/gemaldegalerie/the-glass-of-wine-100

Upcoming Vermeer Lecture in Edinburg

February 2nd, 2011

Vermeer: Being the Viewer
Friday, 18th February 2011, 12.45-1.30pm
National Gallery Complex, National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburg (free, unticketed)

from the gallery website:
Vermeer’s painting is famously hushed. He tried to paint dramatic events, but moved off to conjure real events.

Dr James Lawson, Lecturer in Architectural History at the University of Edinburgh, explores how the observer occupies an increasingly odd position in relation to what is to be seen in Vermeer’s paintings.

http://www.nationalgalleries.org/whatson/calendar/5:367/date/2011-01-24/36/event/20098