Getty Loosens digital image policy

September 7th, 2013
terbrugghes-face

As is enevitable, image-rights policies of art institutions continue to loosen up.

The Getty President Jim Cuno announced in a post on The Iris that it is lifting restrictions on the use of images to which the Getty holds all the rights or are in the public domain.

“As of today, the Getty makes available, without charge, all available digital images to which the Getty holds all the rights or that are in the public domain to be used for any purpose,” wrote Cuno, citing the new program.

Approximately 4,600 images of paintings, drawings, manuscripts, photographs, antiquities and sculpture and decorative arts from the J. Paul Getty Museum will available in high resolution on the Getty’s website for use without restriction. Other images will be added until all Getty-owned or public domain images are available, without restrictions, online.

Art buffs should not miss the delightful Dutch paintings in the Getty Collection. Links to a few are posted below. To download the hi-res image, click on the “download” link directly under the thumbnail image of each painting.

The Music Lesson by Gerrit ter Borch
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=113249

Pictura (An Allegory of Painting) by Frans van Mieris
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=822

Head of a Woman
by Michael Sweerts
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=788

Double Portrait
by Michael Sweerts
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=896

A Woman Preparing Bread and Butter for a Boy
by Pieter de Hooch
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=852

My favorite is, however, Hendrick ter Brugghen’s Bacchante and Ape (6534 x 7548 pixels!)
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artObjectDetails?artobj=845

Beware, Ter Brugghen’s technique is so utterly efficient that ipainting look easy. Even with 40+ years of easel paint under my belt, it is still a discouraging painting to look at it. Sometimes I envy art historians.

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